Ogdens 2 and 3

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My dream camisole collection is growing! I did a small FBA on the True Bias Ogden and the fit is much better. I’m still seeing a little pulling in the upper chest, though it feels fine to wear. For the next one I may just try going up a size without the FBA.

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This top is made from remnants of another silk-cotton voile. I made a long sleeved top out of this fabric in October, but I messed up in construction and took an inch out of the bodice, making it unwearable. I really kicked myself. Burda patterns have fit me so consistently that I got complacent with using small seam allowances, and there was no room for adjustment. Luckily, the Ogden takes so little fabric, I was able to get a top out of the leftovers and salvaged sleeves! I love the fabric, and have worn this top almost weekly since finishing it a month ago.

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Next up is my first 100% silk camisole. I’ve dreamed of having a collection of silk camisoles form the base of my wardrobe for many years, and it’s finally happening! I feel so elegant and put together wearing it under cardigans and jackets, even when I know I don’t quite look it. It sounds so shallow, but feeling good or bad in clothes can really impact my mood. This is a step in the right direction!

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I intended for the matte side of this rosy charmeuse to be shown, but I couldn’t help it. The fabric has more of a luster than a shine, and it’s just so pretty. I pre-washed and dried the fabric in the machine, and serged every raw edge. The silk probably deserves more caring techniques, but this cami will be worn a ton and I want it to hold up, even when inevitably thrown into the dryer by accident. I did hand roll the hem, though, at least there’s that! I go back and forth about pressing the rolled hem flat. I left it for now. I kind of like the soft waviness in person, but it is bothering me in these photos!

I have a few more single yards of silk waiting. I can’t wait to make the next one!

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February shirt in April

IMG_6669Making that motorcycle jacket kind of threw off my monthly Burda project. I might catch up, or not. I haven’t been thrilled with this year’s March and April issues, but last year’s both have a number of designs I would love to make. At any rate, here’s a February design! I’ve been hankering to make a button down shirt, and decided on Burda 2/2016 #108, minus the pockets and sleeve tabs.

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I used a navy silk cotton voile that’s been in my stash for years. It’s absolutely dreamy to wear, like a cloud. I love this shirt and have worn it just about every week since making it. I hope the shirt is stylishly oversize, and not just frumpy. I feel great in it, but it’s hard to tell how it really looks when I’m so biased.

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Eeek, need to iron that collar! 

I did as instructed and made a covered button band, only I’m sure I did not do it right because it’s nearly impossible to button. Luckily, I can slip the shirt on and off without unbuttoning! I’m going to need to find real instructions before attempting this feature again. I hand rolled the hem, which is one of my very favorite techniques. I love the soft roll and wave, not to mention the perfectly narrow hem, especially on such a soft, floaty shirt.

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Green Suede Jacket!

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It’s finished! This jacket is one of my favorite projects of all time. Despite often sewing projects requiring more skills than I possessed since 2009, I never made a real jacket (not counting Grainline’s Morris). I was intimidated, and also thought I didn’t really like wearing jackets. Well, lately I’ve been gravitating to the jackets in my closet, and when nothing else called to me in the January 2017 Burda issue, I decided to give it a go.

 

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What really sold me on this design was the top stitched elbow patches and back panel. What almost stopped me was the thought of sourcing all those zippers. I ended up just buying the one zipper for the front and leaving the rest off. It’s made in a sage green faux suede that has been in my stash for some time. I’m glad to see it go!

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Part of the joy of this project was all the topstitching. Having an edgestitching foot makes all the difference! So easy and SO satisfying.

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The color is nearly impossible to photograph, and ugh, photography. I have finally figured out a good set up to take my own photos, but they turn out terrible. I’m not sure if my phone isn’t focusing right, or light is bad, or what it is. When I take the photos on my dress form they turn out okay. When I take them with a remote they are grainy and out of focus. Sigh.

Photos aside, I’m so pleased with this jacket and the process of making it! There will be more jackets in my future, I’m sure!

The perfect work dress

Well, I’m still working on that jacket, with just the hems to finish! I swear I’ll finish this weekend. In the meantime, I finally wore this dress, which has been almost finished since August and finished since December. I knew it would make its debut at a board meeting, and it finally had its chance in February.

 

I love this dress. The fabric is interesting but subtle, the fit is spot on, and it has stretch so it’s also quite comfortable. The pattern is Burda 9/15 #116. I caught my breath when I first saw it in the magazine, and knew I had to make it. Now I have to make it again in a fabric that actually shows the seaming! This fabric is by Halston, via Fabric Mart, a stretch poly suiting with an interesting pebbly texture.

 

Okay, after all that praise, there is one thing I don’t like, and one thing I acknowledge isn’t perfect but I don’t care about. I flat out dislike the flare in the skirt back. I had a RTW dress with this shaping years ago, and didn’t like it then either. Totally forgot about that! If/when I make this again, I will change the back to a plain straight silhouette with a vent. The other quibble is that the color isn’t the most flattering, but it’s not too terrible.

In the end, it doesn’t matter and I love the dress anyway. It’s sure to be a go-to for quite some time!

A Cape to Match Aster

Here it is, the December Burda Cape! The cape that may have pushed me too far into crazy pet lady territory. I made Aster’s rain jacket first, in desperation, last winter after we brought him home and life was endless puppy walks in the rain. I used a coated cotton that had been in the stash a long time, and had enough left to make me something as originally planned.
I debated making the long version of the cape, but ultimately thought it would be too much lightweight fabric blowing around. I think that was the right choice, but I do wish I had added a few inches.

I left off the patch pockets and did not seam the arms, though I think I may go back and do it. I envisioned wearing this to work with my bag tucked up dry inside, but it’s really too short (my sweaters poke out!). If I’m not wearing it to work, a bit of anchoring would help–it’s windy up here on the coast! The other major design flaw is that the roomy hood blows off in the slightest breeze. I’ve put another snap right under the chin, which keeps it on pretty well.

This was my first time sewing with a plaid. I didn’t do so well. The pattern did include helpful match lines, but even then I wasn’t careful enough and there is some unfortunate seaming at the back and front bands. I hated it at first, but now barely notice!

I lined Aster’s jacket with a cheerful floral, and added a bit of bias at the cape neckline for a little more subtle matching. But the matching. I love it in theory, but was pretty self-conscious outside the house. It’s a little crazy, right? I think it will work, though. Aster doesn’t like his jacket so I only use it if it’s pouring, and in that case I would probably wear something heavier.

All together, I think it will be a great cover up for dog walking and running, particularly during the foggy days of summer. The fog can be so thick that you can’t really tell if it’s raining or just foggy, but with temps in the 60s it’s too warm for a jacket when exercising.

Side note: The amount of beige in these photos is alarming. This appears to be my photo spot, so I’d better figure something out! Curtains instead of closet doors, perhaps. The cat would like that, too!

Ogden Cami

I love camisoles. I’m constantly on the hunt for the perfect thing, both in stores and with patterns. So far, I haven’t had much luck making camisoles, for various reasons. Usually there is something wrong with the neckline, or the finishing, or the shape. There was a camisole in a recent Burda issue that I meant to try, but then the Ogden Cami was released and everyone started making it and it looked great… I couldn’t resist.

I actually like it quite a bit! For this mock-up/test version, I used a loosely woven fabric that I think must be rayon. It was one of those online orders that doesn’t look very good in person, and I assumed this camisole would be pretty much unwearable. Turns out, it looks fine in the finished garment, maybe even a bit elegant! Since the fabric is a little sheer, I made a full lining rather than a facing. By the time I sewed the hems, though, I was running on autopilot and still didn’t believe this was a wearable garment, so I didn’t make any length adjustments. The lining peeks out a bit where the hems aren’t perfectly even, but I don’t really mind it when wearing.
I raised the neckline about an inch, based on photos of others’ projects. It’s the perfect depth now, and I absolutely love the soft v-neck shape. The rest of the camisole is rather swingy, which I like for the most part.
Excuse the rather lousy hemming job. I didn’t think the fabric would work out as well as it did! In a “real” version, I would hand roll the hems.
The project turned out well, however, if I’m being honest with myself I must do an FBA on the next one, as well as most other things I make. I don’t really understand what’s happened over the last couple years as my measurements haven’t really changed (slight bulking up from yoga pushed it over the edge? is that even a thing?), and I’m dismayed, but the truth is that my clothes don’t fit right anymore. I don’t really make resolutions, but a 2017 goal for sewing is to face facts and learn how to do an FBA.
Overall, this is by far the most successful camisole I’ve made, and I’m super excited to make a few in silk!

Burda Wrap Dress

 

I started October sewing with the wrap dress from last year’s October Burda Magazine (#112) that I’ve had my eye on. It’s one of those designs I wouldn’t normally go for, and I’m not sure how I feel about those puff sleeves. The rest of the dress is quite good, though.
Look at the photos! I know they are terrible, but it’s actually me in them and I am using a remote! Big step forward. Now I need to find a place to stand up my phone that doesn’t require climbing on a chair, although, honestly, I think it looks better on my dress form and am considering just giving up on real photos.
I didn’t have suitable fabric in the stash for this dress, and got this poly crepe on sale at JoAnn. It’s a good weight for this dress, but all the details totally disappear. I’m not happy about the visible print repeat either, but it’s most noticeable from the back and I won’t see that part in day-to-day wear.
The sleeves with the inset drew me to the pattern in the first place, but I don’t know. I had trouble setting them in because burda did not provide enough notches. Just one for the shoulder seam and one in the front. There was no indication that you should or should not ease the sleeve in aside from the gathered sleeve cap, and I’m pretty sure my gathering/easing is too centered, leading to bigger puffs than intended. I’m going to try wearing it with sleeves, but I predict they’ll come off before too long.